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David's Page » The UK's New Prime Minister » Fri Jun 9 9:04 pm

david
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Well I was certainly surprised by the election results. A few weeks back the Tories had leads of 20% plus. They finished up with just a 2 % lead and lost their majority. They now have to rely on the Northern Irelands 10 DUP members to prop them up.
In all the years I have seen elections the Conservatives general election performance was the worst I can recall. Labours in contrast was probably the best of all time and it attracted in the young voters. If the campaign had lasted one more week they would probably have had a majority. A feature of the election was that the two big parties obtained over 80% of the votes. So it is a return to the 1950's/1960's era.
The Scottish Nationalists were expected to lose ground but probably lost more than they would have wished. With the two main parties returning to the fray it will be interesting to see if they will now nosedive.
For Theresa May is was a complete disaster and her days as PM are surely numbered.
One of the most remarkable elections I have ever seen.David Posts: 704Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2011 2:02 pm


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David's Page » A Time in Govan » Fri Mar 3 6:11 pm

david
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1950's Govan Freemason's
Book Extract:
' Jimmy Welsh is a Freemason and he occasionally has a drink problem. However, no matter how drunk he gets he does not divulge any secrets of the Brotherhood. Jimmy joined many years ago when he had a small share in the business of John Henderson. Jimmy serviced a number of clients most of whom were Freemason’s when he was active as part of Henderson and Welsh Scaffolders.
He meets with a number of his former customers at the meetings and they discuss everything and anything that comes along. Most are of a similar persuasion; mostly middle aged, Conservative/Unionist biased and many are very sociable.
The Masonic Halls are well kept up in appearance and the meals and drinks with the company after ceremonies are greatly enjoyed by Jimmy. He is always willing to help with fundraising efforts to help needy causes. The actual Ceremonial parts involving rolling up trouser legs, nooses and other rituals did not bother Jimmy and it appeared that the Lodges he now attended usually Kinning Park or Govandale were recruiting new members on a regular basis.
The membership in Scotland was well on its way to reaching around 100,000. It appeared that many Protestants were drifting away from the attendance at Churches in favour of a good class of Working Men’s Club that might give them a leg up when the situation arose.
When, with Joan, Jimmy would attend the Ladies Night but Ruth would probably be very unlikely to attend if asked. She felt more at home in a conventional Working Mens Club or a nice pub.
She knew little of the Freemason’s except that Jimmy attended occasionally the various Lodge meetings. He would receive letters on a regular basis on plain envelopes and had a chest under the bed with his Masonic Regalia. Definitely not in the Freemason’s were brothers Robbie and Jack. Both never had the inclination to join and were contented with life outside the Brotherhood.

David's Page » A Time in Govan » Tue Jan 31 4:16 pm

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·                    Govan Juvenile Courts was noisy. In front of Baillie Jasmina Anderson were 11 boys plus their probation officers. The Baillie said she had a complete football team in front of her. They were charged with playing football on a Sunday and making too much noise. One mother said ’They have nae wher else tae play and they didnae even go wi ther fitba boots on’.  Jasmina Anderson said it was impossible to tell the boys not to play football. They were all admonished and told to play quieter so as not to disturb the residents.
·                    In the Schools Intermediate Cup competition semi finals, St.Gerrards made short work of Falkirk winning 8-2. In an effort to entice the Glasgow Rugby playing schools into playing football; Queen’s Park made Lesser Hampden Park available and provided excellent coaching.
·                    The trials for the Glasgow Schools team to play against London assembled at Lesser Hampden Park and there was plenty of Govan interest amongst the contenders for forward places. G.Mulholland (St.Gerrards), F.Burns (St.Gerrards), R.Burns (Govan High) and I.Lochead (St.Gerrards)
·                    In the West of Scotland Amateur League Govan Amateurs chances of the title had gone although they had a good season finishing in the top half of the league’s top division. In the second division Stephens and Craigton Athletic were trying to avoid relegation.
·                    In the Renfrewshire Juvenile League Avon Villa crashed 6-1 away to Cardwadric Bluebells. Govan Brittania could not make the home advantage at the 50 pitches count as they lost 4-0 to Renfrew Athletic. Tradeston Holmlea did make 50 pitches home advantage count with a 2-1 success over Park United.
    Rangers Willie Woodburn made his second appeal against his ‘Suspended sine die’ sentence from the Scottish FA. He had a lot of support from the Ra

David's Page » A Time in Govan » Wed Dec 21 3:28 pm

david
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GOVAN HIGH BELLA
Govan High had a number of good teachers. However, to Derek one teacher was head and shoulders above the rest. He was not totally popular with all pupils but no teacher at Govan High ever was.
     Derek was suddenly starting to enjoy a few lessons at Govan High. One teacher in particular, Mr.Barry Landman, was firing his imagination. Mr.Landman taught English Literature. He had never given anyone the strap in his entire teaching career it was said. The first books ’Lost in the Highlands’ and ’The Tay Bridge disaster’  Derek read ardently and was able to answer all the questions asked on the books without hesitation. Mr. Landman explained the meaning of the books read. One particular book about an everyday man Mr.Potter and his family was dull and very slow moving; a fact brought up by the entire class.
    Mr. Landman said ’ Living in Govan , life is fast moving for you all. Something, good or bad, always seems to be happening. This book brings you back to what life is like for most people. They live a normal life where they go out to work; come home to the family and participate in a genteel  existence’.  To many in the class they could identify with what he said. Fights between two drunks coming out of a pub on Govan Road was not uncommon. Huge migration of workers to and from shipyards along Govan Road. A huge population of over 100,000 packed into a relatively small area with poor housing a key issue. For the first time in his life Derek  thought ’Things were probably better elsewhere’.   
    Winter time at Govan High Bella was miserable. The lighting was on but the illumination was non existent. Cold weather made snow inevitable and a deep layer covered the footpaths all the way from home to school and back again. On the second day of snow Derek and several others struggled through the snow. Unfortunately, the conditions were such that he and a number of others were around 10 minutes late.
    The entrance

David's Page » A Time in Govan » Sun Oct 16 8:03 pm

david
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Clowns:
There is a lot on the news these days about Clowns being scary. Not always the case as Clowns have brought a great deal of joy to children over many decades.
An extract from A Time in Govan. One of the principle characters in the book is a pawnbroker who helps out the Clowns at Kelvin Hall during the Christmas/New Year period. It is appropriate that they turn up for his wedding in Govan.

John is standing outside St.Mary’s Church at Govan Cross. It is his wedding day and there is a large crowd of wedding guests and well wishers in attendance. The service is now less than half an hour away and Abe is having a laugh with many of the guests and in top form with his wit. John has never seen Abe dress so smartly for anything and he looks the part in his suit.
Suddenly, there is noise from beyond the Pearce Institute. John’s mother Marie had promised John he would have a few surprises; he recognises the sounds immediately. It is the noise of the clowns band who are leading a small procession down Govan Road. Appropriately, the small clowns car follows with the clowns waving to all the children who wave back cheerily. A large number of children scheduled to go into the Plaza ABC minors have just been told the show has, for the first time ever, been delayed by a half hour.
The tall men on stilts come along and Govan Cross comes to a virtual standstill. The police are able to keep the transport moving and keep the wedding guests away from harm. The scene is one of colour and happiness and the clowns are keeping everyone amused with juggling and acrobatics. A few lucky, smaller children are given a ride on the clowns car. Ruth is there and wishes John well saying how lucky he is to be having such a smashing bride as Sandra.
John and the wedding guests are summoned into the church by the minister, the organ plays and the guests take their seats. John and his best man Abe go to the front and the respective families are adjacent and behind. The Church is packed as bo

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I thought this might be of interest to Govanites of old.
It is Pictures kindly given to us from Stevie Whitehead via our David Graham.


Stevie Whitehead Helped the bens to the 1980 Scottish Junior Cup Final by heading the only goal at Hampden Park in front of over 13,000.
Here are the Pictures of 1980 Scottish Cup Final between Benburb F.C. v Baillieston F.C.




1980 Scottish Cup Final between Benburb F.C. v Baillieston F.C.



Benburb F.C.





1980 Scottish Cup Final between Benburb F.C. v Baillieston F.C.




Benburb F.C.





1980 Scottish Cup Final between Benburb F.C. v Baillieston F.C.





Benburb F.C.





1980 Scottish Cup Final between Benburb F.C. v Baillieston F.C.





Benburb F.C.





1980 Scottish Cup Final between Benburb F.C. v Baillieston F.C.





Benburb F.C.





1980 Scottish Cup Final between Benburb F.C. v Baillieston F.C.





Benburb F.C.





1980 Scottish Cup Final between Benburb F.C. v Baillieston F.C.





Benburb F.C.